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Chanson Pere & Fils Bourgogne 2005 and Baez Does Dylan

July 14, 2011 Leave a comment

Still tasting through my mixed case of 2000-2005 Bourgogne Rouge (though the Labouré-Roi Pinot Noir from yesterday wasn’t technically a Burgundy). Next in line is Maison Chanson Bourgogne Pinot Noir from the much lauded 2005 (before the more lauded 2009) vintage. This wine is a blend fashioned from select vineyards of pinot noir from the slopes of Cote de Beaune and Cote de Nuits in Burgundy.

I’m listening to Joan Baez’ rendition of Bob Dylan’s “Don’t Think Twice” from her Baez sings Dylan record. Like so many of Dylan’s songs, “Don’t Think Twice” has been covered and recorded by many others, but Baez’ is the most overwhelmingly heartbreaking I’ve yet heard. On its own, “Don’t Think Twice” is one of the great breakup songs of all time, from the male perspective. On top of this, Joan Baez is one of the truly tragic (living) characters of the ‘60s counterculture movement. Looking back it seems that she really believed that she and Bob would become the king and queen of the People’s Revolution Prom. The dichotomy between that moment and Dylan’s personal and artisic momentum can be seen quite apparently in parts of  Don’t Look Back, D.A. Pennebaker’s famous document of Dylan’s 1965 tour of Europe.

Chanson Pere & Fils Bourgogne 2005, in the glass, the wine is bright ruby w/ a slight purple hue toward the center. It’s light/medium bodied with prevalent raspberry and tart cherry. As the wine breathes and expands it shows some black licorice and white pepper. Chanson Pere & Fils Bourgogne 2005 is another nice, light(ish), food friendly pinot noir from a lower cost Burgundy producer, representing good drinking per dollar spent.

Labouré-Roi Pinot Noir Vin de Pays d’Oc 2010 and Childish Gambino

July 12, 2011 1 comment

A regal cap.

Continuing thoughts on low cost baseline Burgundy, I recently opened a brand spanking new Labouré-Roi Pinot Noir Vin de Pays d’Oc 2010. Vin de Pays simply means “country wine” which is a French designation a hair above table wine. Vin de Pays d’Oc is the largest area from which this classification of country wine hails: the LaguedocRoussillon area of Mediteranian France. I first became interested in Labouré-Roi as they bottle some of the most reasonably priced wines out of Nuits St Georges in Burgundy, a region of long-time fascination for my palate.

I’m Listening to some (free) Childish Gambino tracks which warms the heart that gave up on rap and hip hop a long time ago. The last good album of this genre that I reviewed was the first Black Eyed Peas record, which was long before Fergie, fashion, and pyrotechnics. Since then, only Brooklyn-based Masterminds have turned my ear, and they were never able to gain any mainstream traction. Childish Gambino is the rap persona of writer, comedian, and actor Donald Glover, who was the youngest writer on 30 Rock, but is best known as Troy on Community. While much of his flow pays homage to Lil Wayne (whose work I do not enjoy), Gambino employs a wit and a self-awareness that would make a real rough-neck’s head explode. He puts it best himself, “You used to have to act street and now you’ve got a choice.” Thanks for that, Donald.

Simple, but well made pinot.

At first waft, the Labouré-Roi Pinot Noir Vin de Pays d’Oc 2010 hits with sharp new wine alcohol in a way that feels like a light bourbon or a heavy red fruit liqueur, but that blows off in short order. Beneath is properly drinking medium/light bodied young pinot. The wine has solid structure, but modest depth and nice fruit, showing a palate sprinkled with cool- edge of the forest- earth, spring raspberries, and wild herbs. Oak takes over toward the finish, leaving a dry savory aftertaste. As with any young wine, 6 months in the bottle can only help, but for around ten bucks, this is fully palatable (food friendly) pinot noir today.

Domaine Forey Bourgogne 2002 and the Joys of Cellaring Modest Wine

July 11, 2011 1 comment

Aging like... wine.

Another in the rack of aged Bourgogne, and next in line for tasting is Domaine Forey Bourgogne 2002. Forey first caught my attention with an exquisite 1995 Echezeaux (from a reasonably light vintage) and I have since been impressed with several vintages of their Nuits St Georges and Clos Vougeot. I’m a little skeptical going in as this introductory level pinot noir was soft and unremarkable at release, but I have enjoyed other vintages of this modest villages blend.

The tongue belonging to a far sharper palate than my own likes to say that 90% of all wine is meant to be drunk within 3 years of bottling and the other 10% needs ten years in the cellar. It’s a generalization that I’ve argued against, but whether or not the numbers are precise, the arc of notion is pretty spot on. Yesterday’s Meo-Camuzet Bourgogne 2002, not yet at its decade in the bottle clearly needs more time, while the Domaine Forey Bourgogne 2002, has blossomed quite nicely. I would add that almost all wine benefits from 2 to 3 years in bottle.

The Forey Bourgogne ’02 is dark garnet (burgundy?) in the glass and initially there’s a big waft of alcohol that blows off to reveal petrol and asphalt, like scorched earth, in a good way. If the Road Warrior weren’t a righteous racist, I’d like to think this might be his red of choice, in the price range. This wine has benefited greatly from the cellar time and is leagues more interesting now than when it went in. The palate shows dry earth, tar, and crushed roadside blackberries. Most wine consumption is an act of infanticide. But this ’02 Forey Bourgogne is another example of how well an inexpensive wine, properly stored and aged, can show.